An ID Badge Just for You

caregiver-badge-with-logoOn Saturday, we had our first chat for men in a caregiving role. Richard (@kreisler) and Chris (@thpurplejacket) joined for a really interesting discussion. At one point, I asked Richard if health care professionals often overlook his role as his mom’s family caregiver. Yep, he said.

So, @ejourneys, who lurked during our chat (lurking means you’re simply reading the content of an online conversation), got to thinking. And, her thinking led to the creation of a badge you wear which identifies you as the primary family caregiver for your caree. The badge includes areas for you to insert your name and your caree’s name.

The badge fits standard-sized badge holders. Just download your badge below, print it out, cut out and fill in the badge, and place it with your choice of badge holder (pin, lanyard, etc.). Wear your badge in any setting that you want others to know you are the primary caregiver for your caree.

Because you are the most critical member of your caree’s health care team, you need your own badge.

I’ve also posted the badge in our National group so it’s a readily available resource. Thanks so much @ejourneys for such a great idea!

Download your Caregiver Badge.

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About Denise Brown

I began working with family caregivers in 1990 and launched CareGiving.com in 1996 to help and support them. Through my blog, I share words of comfort and offer coping strategies and tips. I also write opinion pieces about recent research, community programs and media coverage of caregiving issues. I've written several caregiving books, including "The Caregiving Years, Six Stages to a Meaningful Journey," "Take Comfort, Reflections of Hope for Caregivers" and "After Caregiving Ends, A Guide to Beginning Again." You can purchase my books and schedule a coaching call with me in our store.

14 thoughts on “An ID Badge Just for You

    • Mary Ann O'Neal

      What an awesome idea. The interdisciplinary team has meetings during which the resident’s care needs are reviewed. Many times there is no other advocate for the resident, or their family members are far away. What better way to honor and acknowledge those family members who remain a caregiver despite placing a resident in an assisted living or SNF. I am sure this would also remind staff to respect and acknowledge this important piece of the caregiving equation.

      Reply
  1. Profile photo of LarryLarry

    Downloaded yesterday printed filledout and had on at mom’s doctors appointment today. I was told by the staff at the doctors that I had to take off our they could not work with me as they consider it a HIPPA violation for me to have the person’s name displayed that I care for. They recomeded that insted of the primary caregiver for Name to put Primary family caregiver or family care provider with no name of the patient. I talked with the leagel officer for the institution and he stated there have been several law suits filed because a patients name was displayed by someone other than the client and that if they allow someone to display a patients name other than the patient themself that they are contributing to a violation and are thus also guilty so will not allow it to be warn on their property. What do thers think of this.

    Larry

    Reply
    • Profile photo of DeniseDenise Post author

      Hi Larry–Sounds like you had more excitement during the appointment than any of us intended. We’re hoping this helps, not creates a headache. I’m so glad you shared your experience with us.

      I wonder: If your mom gave you permission to wear the badge, then would that be okay?

      I think the value of the badge remains even if the caree’s name is removed.

      @ejourneys and @kreisler – What do you guys think of what happened to Larry today?

      Reply
      • Profile photo of LarryLarry

        Yes I do and what the institutions lawer told me is that she would not be able to approve it without having a lawer right up an authorization sign it, have it noterized and filed with the local court and then I would have to cary a copy of the form that has the offical court seal on it.

        Reply
  2. Profile photo of ejourneysejourneys

    Wow. Obviously I had no idea.
    I just checked the POA I have. It has a “COPY” stamp and shows the stamp of the notary public. No court seal. It has never been rejected.

    I actually haven’t tried wearing the badge yet because I have always been accepted outright as my partner’s caregiver. I am so sorry for the trouble the doctor’s office has given you. I hope a HIPAA expert can help straighten things out.

    Reply
    • Profile photo of LarryLarry

      It is not the POA they have the problem with and needs the court seal it is a form he called a waiver of HIPPA Rights that needs the court seal and my copy of the POA is a copy of the original but haswording in it that a copy has same legal effect as the original does.

      Reply
      • Profile photo of DeniseDenise Post author

        Hi–I reached out on Twitter for some help. @thpurplejacket suggested Florida Blue might be able to help. They responded and are asking their lawyers to look at this.

        I guess what doesn’t make sense to me is this: I’m assuming your mom’s patient file already has a HIPAA consent form signed which allows you access to her information. This obviously wasn’t notorized and filed with the county. Why isn’t this form (with an additional note that the her name on your badge is okay) enough?

        I also wonder if your badge would be okay if it just includes her first name?

        Reply
        • Profile photo of LarryLarry

          She has filled out numorus forms for me to be able to get information as they require a new release form for each visit and then even ask her if it is ok before they even let me go in with her. They seem to consider this as publisising to the world her protected information. I am told that complete name must be removed.

          Reply
          • Profile photo of DeniseDenise Post author

            Again, Wow!

            I just went with my dad to two doctor appointments in the past few weeks. One was with his urologist and the other with his general practitioner. I don’t have POA for my dad (who does not have a cognitive impairment). My brother holds POA.

            Both times, I just went in to the exam room with my dad (and my mom). My dad introduced me and then the doctor gave us results about my dad’s cancer.

            (I must add that the urologist and the GP are brothers in the same practice. However, during each appointment, I interacted with two different nurses, who never asked my dad to sign any consent forms for me to be in the exam room with him.)

            I’m going to give another shout-out to @kreisler. I know he wears his badge and interacts with a ton of doctors for his mom. Richard has modified his badge to include consent from his mom on the back of the badge. But, this doesn’t seem like it will fly with your mom’s doctors.

            I wonder, Larry, who you feel about her doctors. Do you feel that your mom receives the care she needs from them?

          • Profile photo of LarryLarry

            I feel she recives very good cair from them. I just think the institution as a whole takes the HIPPA thing to an extrreem. Though I did notice in today’s news paper that they just reached a settlament in a law suit about a supposied violation and much of there paper work started about the time this suit was filled according to the artical from today paper. (This is the first I have heard of the suit and do not have any details on it other than the suit was filed about a year ago and the settalment was reached last week and is awaiting court approval.)

  3. Profile photo of DeniseDenise Post author

    Ahhhh… Sounds like they’re reacting to the lawsuit. That’s too bad. The institution becomes hyper-vigilant, which complicates it for everyone.

    Reply

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