A Life Line: Our Most Important Work Happens Outside the Cube

helpWhen our companies give us flexible work schedules, we can be available when life calls us to do our most important work.

If this Life Line, I reflect on our life’s most important work, which happens outside the cube. You can read more about my thoughts on Yahoo’s decision to require workers to report to an office here.

What do you think? Please share your experiences in our comments section, below.

Resources

The Caregiving Years handbook

The Caregiving Years, Six Stages to a Meaningful Journey, helps
you answer the questions: Why me? Why now? What now?
Buy here.

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About Denise

I began working with family caregivers in 1990 and launched CareGiving.com in 1996 to help and support them. Through my blog, I share words of comfort and offer coping strategies and tips. I also write opinion pieces about recent research, community programs and media coverage of caregiving issues. I've written several caregiving books, including "The Caregiving Years, Six Stages to a Meaningful Journey," "Take Comfort, Reflections of Hope for Caregivers" and "After Caregiving Ends, A Guide to Beginning Again." You can purchase my books and schedule a coaching call with me in our store.

5 thoughts on “A Life Line: Our Most Important Work Happens Outside the Cube

  1. Profile photo of CareGiverGuyCareGiverGuy

    Lifeline – The day that my mom’s doctor told me that she was suffering from early stages of Binswanger disease which is a form of small vessel vascular dementia, I had focused my entire life in taking care of her 24/7 but then I discovered that I could not emotionally or physically handle the day-to-day responsiblities.

    I decided to apply for a inside sales and marketing job in the Bay Area. In two weeks I discovered a small manufacturer in Berkeley…after three interviews I was hired that Wednesday and to report the following Monday. Saturday my mom fell down and broke her hip. I immediately informed my new employer of my situation and told them that I wanted that job badly but I had to take care of Mom. My new employers told me not to worry “Andrew take care of your Mom…your job will here when you’re ready.”

    I cried after this conversation with the owner of the company. I worked two years with this company during the day with the help of a staff of caregivers and took care of her at night by myself. As a employee, I was extremely successful in building a pipeline of new retail stores, developed a drop ship program for online stores and develop successful new programs for establish retailers.

    The company’s lifeline to me will always be remembered…this is CareGiverGuy!

    Reply
  2. Profile photo of BusybeeBusybee

    I agree with you 100%. Three years ago my husband lost his job from TEVES for miss to many days. Now he is a Full Time Bus Driver. He went from $2300 dollars every two works and now he makes $900 a month. They did not want to hear why he missed and I kept all the papers on file and they did not want to see them.

    The one thing that made me fall for him is how he treated his parents and his daughter. We been taking care of his parents sents 1996 until now. We been married sents 1992.

    We took care of our kids and we were always on the road. Never got a break when our kids were growing up. Now We still don’t get a break from driving. Every two weeks we are running to the hospital at UVA or Culpeper Regional.

    Now it has been a hard road these past weeks. Not even that the Culpeper doctor said we might need to think about Hospice and then say he did not say it. My father-in-law Primary Doctor said that we might what to think about the Quailty of Life.

    OH LORD HELP ME.

    Reply
  3. Profile photo of mymamaskeeper

    I could not have said this any better myself. This is why I decided to start my business and work part-time, to have the time for what matters.

    Reply
  4. Tandy Elisala

    Denise, what a touching video. Four years ago I was faced with the decision of putting my parents in separate facilities; knowing full well they would need much more care over time, or leaving my executive career where I had been for 21+ years. Like you, I was so incredible passionate about our mission and vision. I LOVED what I did and what WE accomplished. I loved my teams, colleagues, and the students we served. There wasn’t one day I ever felt like I didn’t love my job. 12/22/09, that all changed. I became an unexpected full-time caregiver for both parents simultaneously. When I attempted to go back to work, none of it mattered. I was empty. The only thing that mattered was being with my parents. Life’s most important work always happens outside the cubicle! Love it.

    Reply
    • Profile photo of DeniseDenise Post author

      Hi Tandy–I’m so glad you enjoyed the video. Funny how we find a perspective when we face a challenging time. It’s how we really understand our life’s work. :)

      Reply

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