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“King’s Point” Shows How We Age

751670_KingsPoint15-FrankBea_rsSeveral years ago, I visited Mirca Liberti, my mentor who co-founded Children of Aging Parents, at her retirement home she shared with her husband in Florida. It seemed like the life! Beautiful swimming pool, lots of activities, a leisurely pace. I envisioned my sister (and her husband) and I living in a similar community. Our life would consist of mid-morning dips in the pool, late afternoon cocktails and long lunches on our patio. We might even be able to fit in a round of golf.

I may have a different view after watching “King’s Point,” airing on Monday, March 11, on HBO at 7:30 p.m. ET/PT (6:30 p.m PT).

“King’s Point,” inspired by the grandmother of Director and Producer, Sari Gilmantells, tells the story of five individuals living in a Florida retirement community. The documentary offers an insight into how they view aging, illness and love. I have a feeling it will remind us of the angst we experienced in high school.

The trailer, below, offers a glimpse of what you’ll see on Monday. If you would like to tweet as you watch Monday’s airing, use #KingsPoint.

About Denise Brown

Avatar of Denise
I began working with family caregivers in 1990 and launched CareGiving.com in 1996 to help and support them. Through my blog, I share words of comfort and offer coping strategies and tips. I also write opinion pieces about recent research, community programs and media coverage of caregiving issues.

One comment

  1. Avatar of ejourneys

    The FL town where I live was originally built as a retirement community. The median age here is still retirement age, but it’s been slowly dropping. We have an elementary school now. :-)

    My county is quasi-rural, but there’s a lot of vitality here. I’ve met people in their 90s who kick butt. (I used to be involved in several community activities.)

    This post and the trailer remind me of anthropologist Barbara Myerhoff’s excellent book Number Our Days: A Triumph of Continuity and Culture Among Jewish Old People in an Urban Ghetto. Though much has changed since the book’s 1980 release, I believe the human spirit has remained the same.

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