Because You Worry, You're Smart

Denise

Because You Worry, You're Smart

Denise
board-413157_640Recently released research says that worriers have higher verbal intelligence, the ability to understand and work with the written and spoken word. In other words, because you think so thoroughly about events, you can't help but worry.

I like this research because it combats advice I regularly receive: "You know, 90% of what you worry about never happens." I'm not sure who's measuring the 90% but my cup measures a different amount of worries coming true.

I think about my mom's recent fall. If I hadn't been worried about her, I wouldn't have stood at the door, watching to make sure she was okay. If I didn't see her fall, she would have laid on the stoop outside my sister's house until I left. That thought makes my stomach turn.

I do think it can be smart to worry. I also think our worries often signal the need for a good plan.

What do you think? When has worrying helped?

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LilMagill

<a href='http://www.caregiving.com/members/worriedwife/' rel=\"nofollow\">@worriedwife</a>, we have a lot in common! But I envy your metabolism. If I'm going to worry anyway, I wish I'd get that benefit! :-)

LilMagill

This is so nice, Denise. Thank you. I feel like you've written this for me personally! I've never heard this before, and it's a nice change of perspective. Well, I think worrying does help sometimes because it pushes me to act. Even though it causes me a great deal of mental suffering, the feeling pushes me to seek out information and help. My worrying sent me first to a therapist, who has been a great help to me, and then to this website, another great help, and to the lawyer who did our POA, and the senior care manager I'll see on Tuesday. My worry motivated me to step in and take over the driving as much as possible, and even if it's too soon, maybe that's better than too late.