In Six Words, What's Your Story About Drudgery?

Denise

In Six Words, What's Your Story About Drudgery?

Denise
It can feel like the same day over and over.

And, no matter how much you do today you still have more to do tomorrow.

The drudgery of what's required of you can be exhausting simply because you can't find that constant motivation that's needed. How do you get the inspiration to do the umpteenth load of laundry? How do you tap into your inner reserve to prepare one more meal?

So, let's take a break from it all to write a story about it all. Let's write six-word stories about the drudgery. What's it like to face it, be followed by it, to have sleep interrupted by it?

Share your six-word stories about drudgery in our comments section, below. And, share a story by midnight on March 31 for a chance to win a $25 Amazon gift card, which I hope breaks up some of the drudgery.

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Denise

Congrats to <a class='bp-suggestions-mention' href='https://www.caregiving.com/members/opus88/' rel='nofollow'>@opus88</a> who won the gift card!! Look for an email from me. :)

TU

Trying to find my new normal.

Lark

My story of drudgery: My husband, who is diagnosed with FTD, a from of dementia, is incontinent and, at times, does not have time to make it to the bathroom for bowel movements. He tries to urinate in a urinal or make it to the toilet for the rest of his business but he frequently misses the signal that he needs to go to the bathroom and this most often involves urination. He loves, no, he is obsessive about crystal light fruit punch. There are days when he guzzles it all day and into the evening. Every day I hear, \"Is there any juice? Did you get juice at the store? Did you make any juice?\" Over and over he mentions juice. And don't get me started on how many time he asks if I know where his phone is and do I have his phone. He uses the phone to call me if he needs anything and shouting for me is not an option. Well, I will say that he believes it is his second choice because his primary caregiver, me, to put it politely, discourages shouting when a cell phone is nearby. Juice and phone, and, oh yeah, bacon and grits. Bacon and grits every single morning for breakfast. The litany grows. \"Do we have any juice? Have you seen my phone? Do we have bacon and grits in the house for breakfast tomorrow?\" Meanwhile he is missing the body telling him to go use the urinal and the next thing he calls out for me to get are his depends, the pads he uses in the depends, clean shorts and a clean shirt and, by the way, the sheets on the bed or the couch are wet. It is true that he often does get to the urinal. In that case I just have to watch to see if there is anything to dump from the urinal into the toilet. But more than likely the routine is help him stand so he can get his undergarments and shorts pulled up, get him some of his treasured juice, pick up soiled clothes, strip the bed, make up the bed with fresh sheets and water proof sheet, pick up the soiled depends and put them into a plastic bag and toss into the outside trash, go put the soiled clothing, sheets, bed padding, etc. in the washing machine, check on him to make sure he is o.k. then return to what I was doing before he calls my name or the phone rings. This is a bona fide routine and it is drudgery. Combine that with buying the exact same stuff every grocery visit because the exact same stuff comforts him. It is a bit like groundhog day. Drudgery is doing the exact same routine over and over again. Day after day. Why? Because my darling husband's mind has settled on those specific things. Not difficult to do but drudgery for sure.

MikeLur

Caregiving feels endless. Just like Love.

Terry

\"What am I in for today\"?

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