Seeing the Invisible

Chris

Seeing the Invisible

Chris
invMy husband and I had a conversation the other night where he said he's pretty sure the neighbors, save one, thinks he's lazy and has his wife trained. I saw his point, since when it comes to the yard work I am the one mowing the lawn and shoveling and if there are heavy items to be moved I'm out there moving them.

Because the nerve damage to his spine isn't as obvious as missing a limb, it's invisible. The looks of disgust we've encountered more than once at the store because I've loaded the 20-lb. dog food bag means that he's not comfortable going anymore. It's like he wants to be invisible.

It's easy for me to say that those individuals should be ignored, but I'm not invisible.

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Chris

He needs a wheel chair on a part time basis and the amount of talking/ coaxing it took to get him to admit it would help was exhausting. He is under the impression that EVERYONE is staring. I'm sure some are, so I told him when we can we'll install a pirate flag on it and give them something to look.

Il

Chris thank you for posting this. Invisible illnesses are 'rampant' in our society, I think. I think from other people's perspective. I know at least for me and Depression/ PTSD it's invisible and people want me to rise up and 'just' do . . 'just this and that'. I don't know what it's like for you and your husband but I agree with Shasta. Your 'real friends' are the ones that show up for your gig with you.\r\nAlways, il

Shasta

I know several people with an \"invisible illness\" and they say the same thing. It makes you want to hang a sign around your neck stating what your illness is. How's that for \"labeling\" a person with a health problem? \r\n\r\nTell your husband to (try to) ignore them. The people that know him understand why....that's all that matters!\r\n\r\nBlessings,\r\nShasta