Tell Us: Does the Caregiving Experience Get a "Bad Name?"

Denise

Tell Us: Does the Caregiving Experience Get a "Bad Name?"

Denise
hand-1245939_640Tracy Grant, deputy managing editor at The Washington Post, published a piece yesterday called, "I was my husband’s caregiver as he was dying of cancer. It was the best seven months of my life."

In her article, she writes about caring for her husband 10 years ago. "I will never again be as good a person as I was when I cared for Bill," she writes "I will never again have that high a purpose. But every day I also try to find and put into practice the person I became during those seven months. I try to be a little less judgmental, a little more forgiving, a little more generous, a little more grateful for the small moments in life. I am a better person for having been Bill’s caregiver. It was his last, best gift to me."

She also says in her article, "Caregiving has gotten a bad name in this country. Being a caregiver to someone you love can be transcendent, a gift. And yet for too many it feels like punishment." She goes on to list the reason the experience can feel like punishment, including lack of respite and support services, like transportation services for carees to medial appointments.

Her point, though, about caregiving getting a bad name makes me wonder. Do we talk too much about the struggle? Do we quickly walk past the personal growth we experience?

Or, do we need to focus so much on the challenges and the lack of help so that we can get more resources and support?

What do you think? Share your thoughts and comments in our comments section, below.