"They Must Be So Stressed Before They Even Get Here"

Denise

"They Must Be So Stressed Before They Even Get Here"

Denise
gear-64155_640Last Thursday, I gave two presentations on eldercare to a large financial service company that has an office in downtown Chicago. Because I spoke to a department within the company that operates 24/7, I gave two seminars--one at 6:30 a.m. to those coming off third shift and starting first shift and another at 3 p.m. to those coming off first shift and starting second shift.

The morning presentation included lots of discussion from attendees about their experiences. They spoke honestly about the stress and worries of caregiving and shared difficult moments they faced. Their supervisor--a young man probably in his late 20s--listened intently throughout the presentation.

After the presentation, as we straightened up the room, the supervisor said to me, "This was eye-opening to me," he said, "They must be so stressed out before they even get to work." I agreed and shared a few thoughts, including that employees worry about sharing about their caregiving stress with an employer.

"We can help with that," he said. "We can offer employees flex time if they need it."

He had forgotten to print out seminar evaluations, which actually gave him an idea. "When I hand out the evaluation form to each attendee," he said, "I'll make sure to mention we have flex time and can work with them if they need to adjust their schedule."

In the afternoon presentation, the supervisor shared the same information to attendees.

While the information I shared certainly was valuable, I have a feeling that the supervisor's remarks provided that sigh of relief. When an employer can create a reason for employees to let out that sigh with relief, that employer just created a room of loyal employees.

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